Saper Law represents individuals sued by the porn industry

Saper Law represents individuals recently sued for copyright infringement by pornography studios. This article provides some background into the recent wave of lawsuits that mirror the tactics used in law suits filed by the Recording Industry a few years ago:

Did you receive a letter from your internet service provider saying that they need to reveal your personal information? Was it a mass subpoena notification for something you did online?

Do you see things like “motion to quash”, “subpoena defense” or “copyright lawsuit defense” in the letter?

Are you getting sued by a company such as West Coast Media, Hard Drive Productions, Lightspeed Media Millennium TGA, Mick Haig Productions, or Titan Media? Do names like Adult Copyright Group, Media Copyright Group, Larry Flynt Internet Group, or IO Group show up in the letter?

If you answered yes to any of the questions above, Saper Law can help.

What you need to know:

The pornography industry has recently begun combating Internet piracy, with several lawsuits recently filed targeting thousands of accused copyright infringers. For example, Kenneth J. Ford, an attorney operating Adult Copyright Group, has sued over 17,000 file sharers in under two weeks. Adult Copyright Company is a content monitoring company that tracks the distribution of copyright protected adult movies over peer to peer networks. John Steele, a Chicago attorney, has also filed lawsuits potentially targeting thousands of people.

The lawsuit starts when the copyright holder—a studio, producer, etc.—hires a law firm. The law firm in turn hires a peer-to-peer (P2P) detection company or uses its own P2P detection software. The detection company scans P2P networks, looking for users who are sharing the clients’ works. The detection company gives a list of IP addresses used to share the works to the law firm, which files a “John Doe” law suit against the unknown sharers. The court will grant a subpoena forcing Internet Services Providers (ISPs) to reveal the names and physical locations of the IP addresses. The law firm then sends a letter to the accused sharers / copyright infringers, asking that they pay a fine or face a lawsuit. If found liable for copyright infringement, sharers could face up to $150,000 in damages per infringement in court.

You may have received a letter from a representative of the copyright holder. The letters will either inform you that you have been named in a lawsuit already, or that you have been named in a lawsuit anonymously as a “Doe Defendant”. The letter will then inform you that pursuant a Court Order issued by the judge in that “John Doe” case, your Internet Service Provider (ISP) provided your identifying information, including your name and address. The letter will then tell you that unless you contact them and settle within a given amount of time, you will be named as a defendant in a lawsuit.

Why you need a lawyer who understands these types of copyright infringement cases:

Do not ignore any letters from your internet service provider. If you ignore the suit, you run the risk of jeopardizing certain defenses available to you, or worse, having the court enter a default judgment against you. This can lead to wage garnishment, liens on your home, and significant financial burden.

It is important that you understand your rights by consulting an attorney. An attorney can explain the legal jargon and tell you your options.

A lawyer can also help you try to settle with the Plaintiffs. If you try to settle yourself, you may inadvertently or prematurely give up your identity and lose out on some negotiating power. The sooner you contact an attorney, the more leverage you may have in settlement negotiations.

The lawyer or law firm you choose must have experience with both copyright infringement lawsuits as well the methods used to bring law suits against thousands of John Doe defendants. Saper Law’s principal attorney, Daliah Saper, has extensive experience representing individuals sued by the recording industry for file-sharing. These new line of “porn suits” mirror the tactics used by the recording industry a few years ago. You can contact Daliah Saper at 312.527.4100 and at dsaper@saperlaw.com.

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